Mortality

Where you live matters to your health. In fact, your ZIP code may be more important to your health than your genetic code.

—Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Tracking mortality rates by disease, race, ethnicity, gender and geographic area can help to identify disparities in health outcomes within these groups.

Many health disparities are results of inequities in the opportunities and resources that individual's need in order to be healthier. These are often referred to as the social determinants of health and include living and working conditions, education, income, neighborhood characteristics, social inclusion and medical care. 

According to a Robert Wood Johnson report released in 2017, the concept of "health equity" means that everyone has a fair and just opportunity to be as healthy as possible; this requires removing obstacles to health such as poverty, discrimination and their consequences, including powerlessness and lack of access to good jobs with fair pay, quality education and housing, safe environments and health care.

For the purposes of monitoring, health equity means reducing and ultimately eliminating disparities in health and its determinants that adversely affect excluded or marginalized groups (1).

This section assesses mortality rates in Tulsa County, with an emphasis on region and zip code and race/ethnicity in order to identify how health disparities are changing over time.

Top Causes of Death


Tulsa County

1. Heart disease

2. Cancer

3. Unintentional Injuries

4. Lung disease

5. Stroke

6. Alzheimer's disease

7. Diabetes

8. Suicide

9. Influenza and pneumonia

10. Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis


Men

1. Heart disease

2. Cancer

3. Unintentional injuries

4. Lung disease

5. Stroke

6. Alzheimer's disease

7. Suicide

8. Diabetes

9. Assault

10. Influenza and pneumonia


Women

1. Heart disease

2. Cancer

3. Lung disease

4. Stroke

5. Alzheimer's disease

6. Unintentional injuries

7. Diabetes

8. Influenza and pneumonia

9. Chronic Liver Disease and cirrhosis

10. Suicide

Deaths From All Causes

Definition

The mortality rate from all causes is presented as the number of deaths per 100,000 population for both the single year of 2018, and also the rolling totals over the years 2016 – 2018. All rates were age-adjusted to account for differences in age distribution among locations, regions, zip codes and races/ethnicities.

Why is this indicator important?

Mortality rates are important in the measurement of disease and health as it relates to public health planning. Analyzing trends in mortality in specific demographic groups over a period of time can reflect changes in health and highlight areas that need to be targeted through public health services and interventions (1).

How are we doing?

From 2011 to 2018, Tulsa County consistently had an age-adjusted death rate that was slightly lower than Oklahoma but higher than the U.S. In 2018, the rate was 877.8 in Tulsa County, 896.7 in Oklahoma, and 723.6 in the U.S 

There were 17,986 deaths in Tulsa County from 2016 – 2018. The top five causes of death were heart disease, cancer, accidents, lung disease and stroke. These top five causes were the same as the top five in the U.S. overall.

With regard to race and ethnicity, American Indian/ Alaskan Natives had the highest age-adjusted death rate (1,267.6 per 100,000 population), followed by blacks (1,218.4). Non-Hispanics had a higher age-adjusted death rate than Hispanics (960.8 compared to 540.9).

The North Tulsa region had the highest overall mortality rates within Tulsa County at 1,199.8 deaths per 100,000 population.  This rate was clearly much higher than the rates for Tulsa County, Oklahoma and the US discussed above.  Although most of the regions were fairly similar to the rates for Tulsa County and Oklahoma, most of the Tulsa County regions rates for overall mortality were higher than for the US.  

The South Tulsa region had the lowest overall mortality rate within Tulsa County at 724.6 deaths per 100,000 population.  In fact, the South Tulsa region had a rate only slightly higher than that of the US in 2018.  The lowest mortality rate from all causes in this region was in zip code 74014.

The zip code with the highest overall mortality rate was 74050 at 2215.4 per 100,000, which is located in the Sand Springs/West Tulsa region. 

Some zip codes had too few deaths over the time period for rates to be reported.

Heart Disease Mortality

Definition

The mortality rate from heart disease is presented as the number of deaths from heart disease per 100,000 population over the years 2016 to 2018. The rates were age-adjusted to account for differences in age distribution among locations, regions, zip codes and races/ethnicities.

Why is this indicator important?

Heart disease has been the number one cause of death for Tulsa County residents, as well as Oklahomans and United States residents, for many years. The most common type of heart disease in the U.S. is coronary heart disease. Risk factors for heart disease include conditions such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure and diabetes, behaviors such as tobacco use, poor diet, physical inactivity, obesity, excessive alcohol use and genetic factors. Most of these risk factors can be controlled through healthy lifestyle choices, and well as medications when necessary (2).

How are we doing?

Tulsa County and Oklahoma both have consistently had higher mortality rates due to heart disease than the US since 2011.  From 2016 to 2017, Tulsa's rate grew more than the rate for Oklahoma.  We see a trend downward since that time for both Tulsa County (from 261.1 per 100,000 in 2017 to 248.1 per 100,000 in 2018) and Oklahoma (from 246.6 per 100,000 in 2017 to 229.3 per 100,000 in 2018).  None of these regions meet the Healthy People 2020 goal of 100.8 deaths per 100,000 population.

From 2016 – 2018, the age-adjusted death rate from heart disease in Tulsa County was 252.5 deaths per 100,000 individuals. The heart disease death rate was highest in blacks and American Indian/Alaskan Native populations (357.8, and 315.6, respectively). The rates in these two groups were also higher in Tulsa County than in Oklahoma overall.  In Tulsa County, the heart disease death rate in non-Hispanics was almost twice that of Hispanics (270.1 compared to 140.9).  

The North Tulsa region had the highest mortality rate from all forms of heart disease from 2016-2018 at 318.9 deaths per 100,000 population.  This rate was much higher than the rate for Tulsa County for the same time period.  The region with the lowest mortality rate from heart diseases in Tulsa County was the South Tulsa Region, at 200.7 deaths per 100,000 population.

The zip codes with the highest overall heart disease death rates were 74050, 74146 and 74033.  It should be noted, however, that each of these zip codes had relatively small populations with small numbers of deaths.   

Cancer Mortality

Definition

The mortality rate from cancer is presented as the number of deaths from all cancers per 100,000 population, for both the single year of 2018, and over the years 2016 to 2018. The rates were age-adjusted to account for differences in age distribution among locations, regions, zip codes and races/ethnicities.

Why is this indicator important?

Cancer was the second leading cause of death from 2016 – 2018. Continued advances in cancer research, detection and treatment have resulted in a decline in both incidence and death rates for all cancers, although it is still one of the leading causes of death in the United States. More than half of all individuals who develop cancer will be alive in five years. Many cancers are preventable by reducing risk factors such as use of tobacco products, physical inactivity and poor nutrition, obesity, and UV light exposure. Other cancers can be prevented by getting vaccinated against human papillomavirus and hepatitis B virus. Cancer screenings are also effective at identifying some types of cancer early, often in highly treatable stages. These include breast, cervical and colon cancer (3).

How are we doing?

In 2018, the cancer mortality rate was 171.7 deaths per 100,000 population in Tulsa County. This was similar to Oklahoma (178.4) and higher than the United States (149.1). Only the U.S. met the Healthy People 2020 national goal of 160.6 cancer deaths per 100,000 individuals.

From 2016 – 2018, the death rate due to cancer in Tulsa County was 177.8 deaths per 100,000 individuals. The cancer death rate was highest among the black and the American Indian/Alaskan native populations.  The cancer death rate was higher among non-Hispanics than Hispanics (190.8 compared to 113.2).  Overall, Tulsa County had a lower cancer mortality rate than Oklahoma from 2016-2018, and also for blacks, people of multiple races and non-Hispanics.  Oklahoma had higher cancer mortality rates for whites, American Indian/Alaskan Natives and Asians.

The North Tulsa region had the highest cancer mortality rate from 2016-2018 within Tulsa County at 230.0 deaths per 100,000 population.  This mortality rate, again, was much higher than the rates for Tulsa County, Oklahoma and the US.  The region with the lowest mortality rate due to cancer from 2016-2018 was the South Tulsa region at 150.5 deaths per 100,000 population.  

The zip code with the highest overall cancer death rate was 74130 in North Tulsa at 297.1 deaths per 100,000.  The zip code with the lowest cancer death rate was 74131 in the Sand Springs/West Tulsa region.

Lung Disease Mortality

Definition

Lung disease includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema (collectively referred to as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or COPD). The death rate from lung disease is presented as the number of deaths per 100,000 population, for both single year 2018, and over the years 2016 to 2018. The rates were age-adjusted to account for differences in age distribution among locations, regions, zip codes and races/ethnicities.

Why is this indicator important?

Lung disease was the fourth leading cause of death in Tulsa County from 2016 – 2018. Tobacco smoke (including secondhand smoke) is a key factor for the development of COPD, although exposure to air pollutants, genetic factors and respiratory factors can also play a role. Currently, about 14.8 million adults in the U.S. have been diagnosed with COPD, and an additional 12 million people have not yet been diagnosed. This causes a significant burden on the healthcare system, including higher insurance rates and lost productivity (4).

How are we doing?

In 2018, the lung disease death rate was 51.1 deaths per 100,000 population in Tulsa County. This was lower than Oklahoma (62.9) but much higher than the rate in the United States (39.7).

From 2016 – 2018, there were 1,103 deaths due to lung disease in Tulsa County, which was an age-adjusted rate of 54.4 deaths per 100,000 individuals. This overall mortality rate for Tulsa County was lower than the rate for Oklahoma for the same time period (58.8 per 100,000 population).  

The death rate due to lung disease was highest among American Indian/ Alaskan Natives (59.7). The lung disease death rate in non-Hispanics was 58.7 deaths per 100,000 population for Tulsa County for 2016-2018, but there were not enough deaths in the Hispanic population due to lung disease during the time period to be reported.  Oklahoma overall had much higher mortality rates due to lung disease in the white population than Tulsa County, as well as higher rates for the American Indian/Alaskan Native populations.  Tulsa County had higher mortality rates due to lung disease for the black population and those who reported being multiple races.

The North Tulsa region had the highest rate of mortality due to lung disease within Tulsa County at 70.6 deaths per 100,000 population.   Again, this rate is much higher than the rates for Tulsa County, Oklahoma and the US.  The Downtown region had the lowest rate of mortality due to lung disease at 21.2 deaths per 100,000 population.

The zip codes with the highest overall lung disease death rates were 74033, 74073, 74115, 74107 and 74130.

Unintentional Injuries Mortality

Definition

Unintentional injuries (accidents) include motor vehicle accidents, accidental falls, drownings, fires and poisonings. The death rate from unintentional injuries is the number of deaths per 100,000 population, both for the single year 2018 and over the years 2016 to 2018. The rates were age-adjusted to account for differences in age distribution among locations, regions, zip codes and races/ethnicities.

Why is this indicator important?

Accidents were the third leading cause of death in Tulsa County from 2016 – 2018. The top three accident categories are accidental poisonings (38 percent), motor vehicle accidents (24 percent) and falls (22 percent). Accidental poisonings can include unintentional drug overdoses, as well as poisonings from household chemicals or carbon monoxide (5). 

Motor vehicle safety prevention efforts often aim to improve car/booster seat and seat belt use, reduce impaired driving, as well as focus on high risk groups such as child passengers, teen drivers and older adult drivers (6). 

Risk factors for falls include lower body weakness, difficulties with walking and balancing, vision problems, foot pain or poor footwear and home hazards such as uneven steps or clutter that could be tripped over. Most falls are caused by a combination of risk factors (7).

How are we doing?

In 2018, Tulsa County had an age-adjusted unintentional injury death rate of 54.0. This was lower than Oklahoma (62.6) but higher than the U.S. (48.0). This trend has been consistent since 2011. None of these regions met the Healthy People 2020 target of 36.0 deaths from unintentional injuries per 100,000 population.

From 2016-2018, accidents killed 1,045 Tulsa County residents, an age-adjusted mortality rate of 53.8 deaths per 100,000 individuals. This was lower than the rate for Oklahoma for the same time period (61.8). 

With regard to mortality due to accidents by race, in Tulsa County, the death rate was highest among American Indian/Alaskan Natives at 80.6 per 100,000.  This was true for Oklahoma as well, with a rate in this population of 93.5 deaths per 100,000 population.  The second highest mortality rate due to accidents in Tulsa County was in the black population at 62.0 deaths per 100,000. This was not true of the state overall, with the mortality rate for the white population being the second highest rate at 82.4 deaths per 100,000.  The unintentional injury death rate was higher among non-Hispanics than Hispanics (60.9 compared to 34.7).  This pattern, also, was true for Oklahoma overall.  

When examining the regions within Tulsa County, again, the North Tulsa region had the highest mortality rate due to unintentional injuries (82.3 per 100,000).  This rate is much higher than the rates for Tulsa County, Oklahoma and the US.  The mortality rate for unintentional injuries was lowest in the South Tulsa region from 2016-2018 at 38.4 deaths per 100,000 population.

The zip code with the highest overall unintentional injury death rate was 74130.

Stroke Mortality

Definition

The mortality rate from stroke (cerebrovascular disease) is presented as the number of deaths from stroke per 100,000 population, both for the single year 2018 and over the years 2016 to 2018. The rates were age-adjusted to account for differences in age distribution among locations, regions, zip codes and races/ethnicities.

Why is this indicator important?

Stroke was the fifth leading cause of death from 2016–2018 in Tulsa County and is a major cause of long-term disability. Major risk factors for stroke include medical conditions such as previous stroke or transient ischemic attack (mini-stroke), high blood pressure, high cholesterol, heart disease, diabetes and sickle cell disease, behaviors such as an unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, obesity, excessive alcohol and tobacco use and genetic/demographic factors. Risk factors for stroke can be minimized by making healthy lifestyle choices and managing existing medical conditions appropriately (8).

How are we doing?

In 2018, the stroke mortality rate was 46.5 deaths per 100,000 population in Tulsa County. This was higher than Oklahoma (40.3) and higher than the U.S. (37.1). Stroke mortality had been declining in Tulsa County from 2013 to 2016, but has shown steady increases for 2017 and 2018.  The Healthy People 2020 national goal of 33.8 deaths per 100,000 population was not met by any of these regions.

From 2016–2018, the death rate due to stroke in Tulsa County was 44.1 deaths per 100,000 individuals. The stroke death rate was highest among American Indian/Alaskan Natives (89.1 deaths per 100,000). This was much higher than the rate in this population for Oklahoma overall at 56.7 deaths per 100,000.  The stroke death rate among non-Hispanics was higher than Hispanics (46.8 compared to 17.7).  This was also true for Oklahoma overall.

The Downtown region of Tulsa County had the highest mortality rate due to stroke from 2016-2018, with a rate of 73.4 deaths per 100,000 population.  The region with the second highest mortality rate due to strokes was the North Tulsa region at 56.2 deaths per 100,000.

The zip codes with the highest overall stroke death rates were 74110 and 74127, both of which are in the North Tulsa region.


Alzheimer's Disease Mortality

Definition

The Alzheimer’s death rate is the number of deaths due to Alzheimer’s disease per 100,000 population, both for the single year 2018, and over the years 2016 to 2018. The rates were age-adjusted to account for differences in age distribution among locations, regions, zip codes and races/ethnicities.

Why is this indicator important?

Alzheimer’s disease was the sixth leading cause of death in Tulsa County from 2016–2018. Experts suggest that up to 5.2 million Americans age 65 and older have Alzheimer’s disease. These numbers are predicted to more than double by 2050 unless more effective ways to treat and prevent this disease are found. Risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease include age, family history and access to health services for prompt diagnosis. The total estimated cost for person's with Alzheimer's disease and dementias was estimated to be $236 billion in 2016. These costs include health care, long-term case and hospice (9).

How are we doing?

In 2018, Tulsa County had an age-adjusted Alzheimer’s death rate of 43.4. This was higher than both Oklahoma (38.3) and higher than the US (30.5). The Alzheimer's disease mortality rate declined in Tulsa County from 2015 to 2016, after increasing since 2012, then continued to rise from 2016 to 2018.

From 2016–2018, the age-adjusted death rate due to Alzheimer’s disease was 38.3 deaths per 100,000 individuals in Tulsa County. This was almost identical to the rate for Oklahoma overall for the same time period (38.8 deaths per 100,000).  

The age-adjusted death rate among blacks was the highest in Tulsa County at 44.0 deaths per 100,000 population, followed by American Indian/Alaskan Natives at 42.7 deaths per 100,000.  The Alzheimer's disease death rate was higher among non-Hispanics than Hispanics (40.3 compared to 24.2). 

The Jenks/Bixby region had the highest mortality rate due to Alzheimer's disease, at 54.3 deaths per 100,000 population.  The Midtown region had the lowest mortality rate due to Alzheimer's disease at 25.1 deaths per 100,000.  The Downtown region had too few deaths due to Alzheimer's disease to be reported.

The zip code with the highest overall Alzheimer’s death rate was 74134 in the East Tulsa region and 74037 in the Jenks/Bixby region .

Diabetes Mortality

Definition

The diabetes death rate is the number of deaths due to diabetes mellitus per 100,000 population for the single year 2018 and over the years 2016 to 2018. The rates were age-adjusted to account for differences in age distribution among locations, regions, zip codes and races/ethnicities.

Why is this indicator important?

Diabetes mellitus (commonly known as diabetes) was the seventh leading cause of death in Tulsa County from 2016–2018. Diabetes affects an estimated 29.1 million people in the United States and is also the seventh leading cause of death nationally. It increases the all-cause mortality rate 1.8 times compared to persons without diagnosed diabetes, doubles the risk of heart disease and is the leading cause of kidney failure, lower limb amputations and adult-onset blindness (10).

How are we doing?

In 2018, Tulsa County had an age-adjusted diabetes death rate of 20.8. This was lower than Oklahoma and the United States (29.0 and 21.4 respectively). All of these regions met the Healthy People 2020 national goal of 66.6 deaths per 100,000 population.

A total of 433 Tulsa County residents died from diabetes from 2016–2018. This is an age-adjusted rate of 21.5 deaths per 100,000 individuals. This was lower than the mortality rate due to diabetes for Oklahoma which was 28.4 deaths per 100,000 for the same time period.  

In Tulsa County, the age-adjusted death rate for blacks was the highest at 56.3 deaths per 100,000, followed by American Indian/Alaskan Native at 51.6 deaths per 100,000.  The death rate was slightly higher in Hispanics compared to non-Hispanics (23.1 compared to 18.5).

The North Tulsa region had the highest mortality rate due to diabetes of the regions within Tulsa County at 39.8 deaths per 100,000.  The East Tulsa and South Tulsa regions were almost identical and were the regions with the lowest mortality rates due to diabetes within Tulsa County.

The zip codes with the highest diabetes death rates were 74106, 74120, 74127, 74126 and 74133.

Suicide Mortality

Definition

The mortality rate from suicide is presented as the number of deaths from suicide per 100,000 population, for both the single year 2018 and over the years 2016 to 2018. The rates were age-adjusted to account for differences in age distribution among locations, regions, zip codes and races/ethnicities.

Why is this indicator important?

Suicide was the eighth leading cause of death in Tulsa County from 2016–2018. Although the causes of suicide are complex and determined by multiple factors, the goal of suicide prevention is to reduce risk factors and increase factors that promote resilience (protective factors). Risk factors include family history of suicide or child maltreatment, previous suicide attempts, history of mental disorders and substance abuse and barriers to mental health treatment. Protective factors include effective clinical care for mental, physical and substance abuse disorders, family and community support and easy access to a variety of clinical interventions and support for help seeking. Prevention aims to address all levels of influence (individual, relationship, community and societal) (11).

How are we doing?

In 2018, Tulsa County had a suicide death rate of 20.1, which was very similar to that of Oklahoma (19.9) but higher than the United States (14.2). The suicide mortality rate has fluctuated over time in Tulsa County since 2011. Additionally, the rates in Oklahoma and Tulsa County have consistently been higher than the rate in the US since 2011. None of these regions met the Healthy People 2020 goal of 10.2 deaths from suicide per 100,000 population.

From 2016–2018, there were 370 suicide deaths in Tulsa County, which was an age-adjusted death rate of 19.4 deaths per 100,000 individuals. This was almost identical to the mortality rate for suicide for Oklahoma overall (19.6 deaths per 100,000 population) for the same time period. 

In Oklahoma, the suicide death rate was highest among whites (34.4 per 100,000), while in Tulsa County, the suicide mortality rate was highest in the American Indian/Alaskan Native population at 22.5 per 100,000). The rate was almost double for non-Hispanics compared to Hispanics (22.2 compared to 11.4) in Tulsa County.  This trend was seen in the suicide mortality rates for Oklahoma overall as well.

Mortality rates from suicide were high in 3 Tulsa County regions; the Sand Springs/West Tulsa region (24.0 deaths per 100,000), the Midtown Region (24.8 deaths per 100,000) and the Downtown region (25.0 deaths per 100,000).  The mortality rates for suicide were lowest in the North Tulsa region (14.4 per 100,000) and the Owasso/Sperry region (14.8 per 100,000).

The zip code with the highest overall suicide death rate was 74119, which is in the Downtown region.

Influenza and Pneumonia Mortality

Definition

The influenza/pneumonia death rate is the number of deaths due to either influenza or pneumonia per 100,000 population, for the single year 2018 and over the years 2016 to 2018. The rates were age-adjusted to account for differences in age distribution among locations, regions, zip codes and races/ethnicities.

Why is this indicator important?

Influenza/pneumonia was the ninth leading cause of death in Tulsa County from 2016–2018. Influenza is a highly contagious viral infection that often causes fever, headache, cough, chills, sore throat, nasal congestion, muscle aches, loss of appetite and a general achy feeling. It can be complicated by pneumonia, which is a serious infection of the lungs. The air sacs fill with pus and other liquid, blocking oxygen from reaching the bloodstream. If there is too little oxygen in the blood, the body's cells cannot work properly, which can lead to death. Influenza/pneumonia can be especially dangerous in individuals who are immunocompromised, such as the elderly or persons with underlying medical conditions (12).

How are we doing?

In 2018, Tulsa County had an age-adjusted influenza/pneumonia death rate of 17.2 deaths per 100,000 population. This was very similar to Oklahoma (17.8) and higher than the US (14.9). The influenza/pneumonia mortality rate has fluctuated in both Tulsa County and Oklahoma since 2011.

There were 311 deaths attributed to influenza/pneumonia among Tulsa County residents from 2016 – 2018, which was an age-adjusted rate of 15.5 deaths per 100,000 individuals. This rate was slightly higher than the rate for Oklahoma at 14.3 per 100,000 for the same time period.  

The age-adjusted death rate was higher among American Indian/ Alaskan Natives compared to other races (25.6 deaths per 100,000 for Tulsa County and 22.3 deaths per 100,000 for Oklahoma overall).  The mortality rate for influenza and pneumonia was slightly higher in the non-Hispanic population than the Hispanic population in Tulsa County (16.5 compared to 15.4); whereas it was the opposite for Oklahoma overall, with the mortality rate for Hispanics slightly higher than the mortality rate for non-Hispanics (15.5 compared to 15.1).

The Downtown region had the highest mortality rate for influenza and pneumonia in Tulsa County at 28 deaths per 100,000 population for 2016-2018.  The East Tulsa region had the lowest mortality rate for influenza and pneumonia in Tulsa County at 9.2 deaths per 100,000 during the same time period.

The zip codes with the highest overall influenza/pneumonia death rates were 74126 and 74134. 

Chronic Liver Disease and Cirrhosis Mortality

Definition

The chronic liver disease and cirrhosis death rate is the number of deaths due to either chronic liver disease or cirrhosis per 100,000 population, for the single year 2018 and over the years 2016 to 2018. The rates were age-adjusted to account for differences in age distribution among locations, regions, zip codes and races/ethnicities.

Why is this indicator important?

Chronic liver disease is characterized by the gradual destruction of liver tissue over time and includes both cirrhosis and fibrosis of the liver. Chronic liver disease can be caused in a variety of ways, such as by viruses like hepatitis B and C, or from drugs, poisons, or drinking too much alcohol. As cirrhosis and fibrosis of the liver occur, scar tissue replaces normal functioning liver tissue which limits blood flow through the liver. As this function is lost, nutrients, hormones, drugs, and poisons are not processed effectively by the liver. Additionally, the production of proteins and other substances in the liver is inhibited (13).

How are we doing?

In 2018, Tulsa County had an age-adjusted chronic liver disease and cirrhosis death rate of 13.6 deaths per 100,000 population. This was lower than Oklahoma but higher than the United States (15.4 and 11.1 respectively). The chronic liver disease and cirrhosis mortality decreased in Tulsa County from 2011 to 2015, and then began increasing slightly from 2015 to 2018.   

There were 273 deaths attributed to chronic liver disease or cirrhosis among Tulsa County residents from 2016–2018, which was an age-adjusted rate of 13.1 deaths per 100,000 individuals. This rate was slightly lower than the rate for Oklahoma (14.1 per 100,000) for the same time period.

In Tulsa County, the age-adjusted death rate among American Indian/ Alaskan Natives was more than double the rate among whites (30.1 compared to 12.6). This trend held true for the state of Oklahoma overall as well in the same time period.  The age-adjusted mortality rate due to chronic liver disease and cirrhosis was lower in Hispanics than non-Hispanics (9.6 compared to 14.4).

The regions with the highest mortality due to chronic liver disease and cirrhosis were the Midtown region (16.3 deaths per 100,000) and the North Tulsa region (15.7 deaths per 100,000).  The Owasso/Sperry region had the lowest mortality rate for chronic liver disease and cirrhosis at 7.7 deaths per 100,000.

The zip code with the highest overall chronic liver disease and cirrhosis death rate was 74108.

Life Expectancy

Definition

Life expectancy is the average additional number of years a person can expect to live at a certain age. The term ‘life expectancy’ is generally referring to the average number of years a person may expect to live when they are born. The three-year totals for life expectancy at birth are given here for each race/ethnicity, region and ZIP code.

Why is this indicator important?

Life expectancy trends, along with other health indicators, can help public health officials identify health disparities in the community and measure health improvement outcomes. Health officials can use this information to implement health policies and interventions to target issues that negatively and positively impact health within the community.

THD and community partners are continuing to work together on life expectancy research. Future analyses will examine the impact of socioeconomic factors on life expectancy. Additionally, future analyses will explore the economic value of public health resources and healthcare expenditures on improved life expectancy outcomes.

How are we doing?

From 2016 – 2018, Tulsa County residents had a life expectancy of 76.1 years. This was lower than the United States (78.7 years), and also slightly lower than Oklahoma (76.6 years). Tulsa County and Oklahoma data is shown for 3-year rolling totals, while U.S. data is single year data. The year shown for the U.S. is the first year listed on the Oklahoma and Tulsa County 3-year totals (i.e., 2011-2013 shows data from 2011 for the US).

Overall, 'multiple races' had the highest life expectancy (82.0 years). This was true for Oklahoma overall as well (84.6 years).  Blacks and American Indian/ Alaskan Natives had a life expectancy that was about six-seven years shorter than Tulsa County overall, this also was true for Oklahoma overall.  Hispanics in Tulsa County, as well as Oklahoma, had higher life expectancy than non-Hispanics (Tulsa County; Hispanics, 83.1 years, non-Hispanics, 74.8 years: Oklahoma; Hispanics, 81.2 years, non-Hispanics, 75.5 years).

The South Tulsa region had the highest life expectancy for 2016-2018 at 79.6 years, about 2 and a half years longer than for Tulsa County overall.  The region with the lowest life expectancy in the Tulsa County metro region was the North Tulsa region, at 70.6 years. 

The zip code with the highest life expectancy was 74014 in the South Tulsa region (83.4 years). The zip code with the lowest life expectancy was 74106, which is in the North Tulsa region (68.9 years). There is a difference of 14.5 years between these two zip codes. 

Explore the Data



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